How To Be A B2B Pro When Working With Chinese Mobile Game Companies

How To Be A B2B Pro When Working With Chinese Mobile Game Companies

By Michelle Zhao, Managing Director – Greater China, LAI Global Game Services

Before we get into the data, let’s take a look around China:

Waiting in queues

In the subway car

The lucrative market

By the end of 2013, China had a $13 billion revenue game industry and 490 million players according to GPC, the China Game Publishers Association Publications Committee. Accounting for $1.8 billion, with 310 million mobile gamers, the mobile gaming market has been especially hot, seeing the largest growth in 2013 after rising 246.9% from the previous year. With the open policy of 4G license issuing (Dec. 2013) and economic growth in 2nd and 3rd tier cities, more people are expected to play mobile games. It is estimated that hardcore mobile games will be taking over half of the mobile game market in 2014. (Hardcore game mobile growth: 8% in 2008, 42% in 2013, 52% est. in 2014[1])


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从游戏本地化视角看新兴的中国游戏机市场

从游本地化角看新的中国游机市

作者:赵梦雪,美国LAI(Language Automation, Inc.)大中华区执行长

Rory Schussler, 特别通讯员

译者:赵梦雪

 

一月初,中国政府解除了长达13年的游戏主机生产和销售禁令,给中国游戏市场未来注入一支新的兴奋剂。然而, 面对这个机会,要想知道大型游戏主机厂商是否能成功把握,还时机尚早。(任天堂表示至今未有进入中国市场的计划,索尼雄心勃勃,计划在2014年3月出售500万台PS4 。)政策的修改细节还未颁布。内容限制会对游戏设计造成问题。盗版和水货市场也令人担忧。摆在我们面前的最大的挑战,是如果适应独特的中国市场。


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Perspectives on Game Localization for the Emerging Chinese Console Game Market

Perspectives on Game Localization for the Emerging Chinese Console Game Market

By Michelle Zhao, LAI’s Managing Director for Greater China and Rory Schussler, Special Correspondent

Earlier this January, China lifted a 13 year ban on the sale and manufacture of gaming consoles. This has generated great excitement about the future of the video game industry in China, but it is still too early to know how successful the big console players will be in taking advantage of this opportunity. (Nintendo has said they have no plans so far for entering the Chinese market; Sony is making ambitious plans to sell 5 million PS4s by March, 2014.)

We’re still waiting on more details from the government on how the change in regulation is going to work. Restrictions on content are an issue for game designers. Piracy and the grey market are major concerns. The biggest challenge is how to adapt to the differences of the Chinese market.


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Episode 3 – LAIzer & Gaijin Goombah in China!

What kind of difficulties will LAIzer and Gaijin Goombah face in China? Beware – the Fumon are reeking havoc!

 

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How Video Game Translation Differs From Other Types of Translation

At Language Automation, Inc. (LAI), we focus specifically on the translation and localization of video games and ensure all of our translators have experience within the video game industry.  Why is this important?

Well, have you ever tried to explain a video game to your parents, grandparents, significant other, anyone who isn’t a gamer?  Assuming both of you are fluent speakers of the same language, as soon as you launch into World of Warcraft jargon, you may as well be speaking an entirely different language.  

For example, in the comic above, this avid gamer is screaming about a graveyard, mobs, runs, Taurens, and tanks.  Now, unless your mom is leveling her own toon in WoW, you may as well be speaking Martian.  And, chances are, unless your translator’s accreditation program had a class focused specifically on the translation of key vocabulary in MMORPG’s (unlikely), your run-of-the-mill translator will have no idea how to translate words like “pull,” “mob,” “run,” “Tauren,” and “tank,” much less the host of other WoW-centric words including “rez” and “drop.”  By now, WoW has a rather extensive library of words used for the various language packs available to players, but many games don’t have that luxury.
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LAI’s New Video Interview Series about Culturally-Focused Video Games – Mexico & Day of the Dead

This month marks the start of our new video interview series beginning with an independent developer based in Mexico City!  Our interview series highlights game companies that create video games inspired by culture and rooted in regional tradition.  Below is our 3-part interview series with Phyne Games, a company recently featured on MTV for Mictlan - a game based on Day of the Dead.  The entire interview can also be viewed on our YouTube playlist.

 

Part 1 includes an introduction describing the state of the video game industry in Mexico. Part 2 marks the beginning of the interview and Part 3 the second half and conclusion. If you have suggestions for improvements or interest for future participation in a LAI interview, please tweet us @LanguageAutoInc.

 

Part 1: Introduction to Phyne Games and the Mexican video game market

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When to Forgo the Culturalization of Video Games: Contextualizing Globalization within the Mobile Marketplace

* A featured article on Gamasutra. *

Written by LAI’s Game Localization Marketing Specialist Karin Skoog in collaboration with LAI’s CEO David Lakritz.

 

Localization is the adaptation of video games for regional markets, to include changing components such as graphics and cultural references.  Localization is important so gamers within specific regions can enjoy the game as if it were the original, by integrating key aspects of local culture while also adhering to legal and regulatory requirements.  (It is necessary to censor certain components of games in order for governments or organizations to approve a game’s release or rating.)  The ultimate goal of localization is to ensure the game makes sense for natives while maintaining the original feel of the game.  Localization can occur in the absence of text or audio translation.  For example, no translation is necessary in manipulating images like eliminating skeletons and exposed bone in Chinese versions of games to accommodate for country restrictions.

*         
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Courses, Certificates, and Credentials Related to Game Translation and Localization

While there are a plethora of resources and training materials available for translators, there are a few education opportunities geared specifically toward video game translation.  LAI scoured the internet for coursework, certifications, and degrees with a video game component.  Below are the available credentials and related descriptions.

In addition to the following courses and degrees, be sure to check Ian Bogost’s current list of courses at Georgia Tech.  A former class he taught was titled “Videogame Adaptation and Translation.”  The University of Limerick in Ireland also put on a “Summer School” called “Computer & Video Game Localisation” in 2011.  The website includes video presentations of the session.  Be sure to check back on our blog for future education opportunities.

 

University of Roehamption. London – MA in Audiovisual Translation

Description: The MA in Audiovisual Translation is a leading course in its field, recognised internationally and a member of the European Masters in Translation network coordinated by the European Commission.  The course offers teaching and training in core subjects of Audiovisual Translation, such as subtitling and dubbing, but also in innovative areas of accessibility (respeaking and audio-description, for instance) and localisation (software and video games localisation).  Academic staff are all research active and involved with members of the translation industry.

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Mistranslations in Practice – A Short Story

This blog post is a little different than the others.  In this entry, you will read the tale of a gamer embarking upon an adventure, an adventure through a game unlike any other…a game riddled with odd happenings and strange occurrences, a game that takes you back to games of ancient times, a game that transforms the gamer’s entire gaming experience, a game that…well, you’ll see…

 

Soda – check.  Chips – check.  Controller – That’s a given.  Shoot, where are the batteries…“Mom!!!”

Okay, now I’m ready.

The start menu pops up – a fantasy world unfolds before you, complete with elves in a wooded, magical land.  (You know it’s magical because of the fairy dust shimmering through unfurling fog.)  A white, Asian-style dragon soars across the landscape, small in the distance.  The music is a symphonic masterpiece, beautifully constructed to convey a sense of serene majesty, with the rich sound of violins and the lilting melody of flutes resonating together.

Suddenly, the music crackles like an old radio being tuned, and chanting overshadows the tranquility of the scene.  “Cha b’urrainn do bhàrd, thuirt thu, a dhualchas no a thìr a roghainn, air neo a chànain…”  A word appears, blinking on the screen “STRAT.”  The symphony overtakes the chanting for an instant, and then it continues, “…ach du choir gu robh an dìlseachd a b’àirde’s a bu shàir a bh’aige da chogais fhèin a-mhàin …”  The sound cuts out, and the screen goes dark.  The only visible object is the word “STRAT” blinking on the blackened screen.
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Translation Conferences May – December 2012

It’s a job and a half finding all of the industry conferences and events happening around the world, so we made life easier for you by providing a comprehensive list of relevant translation conferences and locations/dates.  Also check out our earlier post with video game conferences and which ones we will be attending.

If there are any conferences we missed, please let us know @LanguageAutoInc.  We greatly appreciate and encourage feedback!

Sign up for our newsletter to receive monthly conference updates.  Enjoy!

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Other Relevant Conferences

June 4-6, 2012 Localization World Conference & Exhibits at Le Palais des Congrès de Paris in Paris, France

June 22, 2012 Ludus: The Narrative of Games and the Art of Play at the University of London in New Cross, London
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